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Scottish | Kobe Sirloin Steak1451 viewsI personally think the best way to cook a Scottish | Kobe sirloin steak is on the grill, with a bit of ground pepper and ground sea salt. This piece of steak is served with garden peas and potatoes. We grow our own potatoes at Lucies Farm and I'm amazed at how different they taste from "store bought" potatoes.1 comments
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Scottish | Kobe Shabu Shabu Beef3377 viewsThis is aged Scottish | Kobe topside, frozen, and then cut paper thin. We pack it on special grease proof, food-grade paper. It's delicious in shabu shabu --- and we have a good customer who eats in raw, as carpaccio.
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An assortment of Scottish | Kobe Beef1185 viewsHere's an assortment of the various cuts of Scottish | Kobe beef that we have available at Lucies Farm. With apologies for the "plug," all of these can be ordered on our website.
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Scottish | Kobe Fillet Steaks280 viewsTwo prime, aged Scottish | Kobe fillet steaks. Unfortunately, each steer only provides 17 to 18 fillet steaks, and we package them in a pair. So we only receive eight or nine packages from each steer. As a result, there is always a back-order situation for fillet steak. You can join the queue at the Lucies Farm e-commerce site.
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Australian Wagyu Sirloin Steak1359 viewsWe have just received a shipment of Australian Wagyu sirloin steak. Here's one of the steaks.
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Picanha Steaks on the Grill1510 viewsPicanha is a cut of beef in Brazil that is generally considered to be the best part of the cow, even better than the fillet. Picanha (pick-ahn-yeh) is a Portuguese word, without direct translation into English. Brazilians travelling to the U.K. are often surprised to discover that what they consider to be a prime delicacy is divided among other cuts by British butchers.
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Preparing the Picanha789 viewsMarjorie has cut cross-hatches on the fat layer of the picanha, and is about to rub salt onto the meat (and particularly into the cuts). When cooking the meat, it's important not to pierce it -- in doing so, the juices will escape.
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Two Picanha Steaks Cut From The Whole3704 viewsThis is the piece that Marjorie rubbed with salt. We have cut the steaks quite thick, and are about to put them on the grill.
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Cooked Picanha Steak3713 viewsWe did not cut this when it was on the grill -- this kept the juices inside. When we cut it, hot, on the cutting board, the delicious melted Kobe fat just poured out. Delicious with a simple salad.
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Close-Up of Cooked Picanha Steak3714 viewsShowing the fine marble of fat, and the grain. This meat was virtually fork-tender, and loaded with juices from the melted Kobe fat.
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Picanha Steaks on the Grill300 viewsIt's important not to pierce or cut them when they're cooking --- that will keep in the majority of the jucies. The fat in grain-fed beef (and ours is certainly grain-fed) melts at a lower temperature than the fat in grass-fed beef. One food critic described Kobe beef as "self-basting." These steaks were delicious!
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Scottish | Kobe Rump Steak308 viewsCooked with a pat of Alderney Island butter (from Guernsey cows), a baked potato with fresh chives, and some snap peas.
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